Sycamores

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During one of my recent tree dowsing workshops I asked the participants to dowse a sycamore tree. It seemed resistant to contact  and when they tried to find the outer edges of its energy field it indicated that it was very tight and compact.

This intrigued me and I started to find out what was the cause of this resistance. I have visited a variety of sycamores from young to mature and I am getting the same responses. They are all well and have no real problems but they  all have lateral energy fields confined to the edges of their canopies. As I have the ability to act as a conduit to bring latent energies to a tree I asked each sycamore whether they wanted me to increase their energy fields. The answer was always No!

Other trees I have visited are keen to have their energy fields extended but sycamores are happy but sycamores are happy to remain as they are. At each of the last three Winter Solstices when there has been an increase in natural energies the sycamores have absorbed it into themselves. Last year when no oak or ash produced seeds the sycamores all seeded. With no competition the ground is covered in baby sycamores. With more questioning it became clear that they are putting all available energy into growth and the production of seeds. Their self-imposed energy field is confined to the edge of their canopy, going up to the top and very bottom of the tree. The best way to describe it is as a truncated tube of energy spiraling, in a clockwise direction, around the tree. In their matter of fact, insular approach they get on with the job of growth.

Oaks and ashes communicate with each other but the sycamore is silent. As a non-native, imported tree that is often described by foresters as a weed it does not have a good reputation. A mature sycamore is a good looking tree with many assets and uses. We need to look at them more closely as the indications are that sometime in the future they will start talking to other trees and us.

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